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About

The knowledge of what it is to be a woman didn’t go down in history books or tomes of philosophy. It was passed from woman to woman. Women lived in close-knit communities where they taught each other to clothe and feed their families’ bodies. And they taught each other to clothe and feed their families’ souls.

Recovering that tradition is what Experimental Wifery is all about, but it isn’t an easy task. That’s why we recall lessons from our friends, mothers, grandmothers, and great-grandmothers. Why we read great books and watch great films of the past and present with women we want to be like—and a few we don’t. And why we look back to great women from history to learn how they found their own ways to be great women and wives. It’s an experiment for married and marriage-minded women who want to learn to be better women, wives, and people.


About the Author

2014-solove-1075Alison Fincher Solove writes most of the content for Experimental Wifery. In addition to being a wife to her husband Adam and mother to her children Thomas and Lucy, Alison also teaches high school English part-time at the Brookewood School. She has degrees in literature and political philosophy from Oxford University and the George Washington University.

Read more about Alison and Adam…


Contact

You can contact Experimental Wifery at experimentalwifery@gmail.com.


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2 responses »

  1. Hi Alison – I have missed reading your blog posts. I hope all is well with you and your family.

    Gaye

    Reply

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